Aryan Circle

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     Aryan Circle logo.jpg

    Status: Active
    Formed: 1985
    Areas of Operation: United States; Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, West Virginia
    Headquarters: United States; Texas
    Ideology: Social (White Supremacist)
    Group: 1,400 members
    Leader: Greg "Droopy" Freeman
    Affiliates: Aryan Brotherhood, Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, Mexican Mafia, Ku Klux Klan (White Knights of the KKK)
    RSS:
    Map:  

     

    Organizational History

    The Aryan Circle, based primarily in Texas, is a growing force in the white nationalist community.It started in the Texas prison system in 1985 as the effort of a few white inmates who were attempting to preserve white supremacist beliefs and create a system of protection against black and Latino gangs. As of 2009, it was the second largest white supremacist gang in the Texas Department of Corrections (TDC).[1] Not only is the group prominent in the Texas prison population, but also in other state systems, the federal prison population, and outside the prison walls in the civilian world.It is this last presence that worries policing officials as criminal activity has been affected in the region.

    Structure

    The Aryan Circle has a paramilitary structure with an elected president and commanders, called the Upper Board, who control the various segments of the gang population, separated by their places in prison and/or the “free world.”The Middle Board of each segment is made up of majors, captains, and soldiers. 

    Funding

    Much of the group’s funding comes from the sale of group publications, donations, and money earned from criminal activity. 

    Recruitment

    Most members are recruited in prison, although the movement of the group from the prison to society has increased recruitment activities on the streets.Background checks are usually conducted on prospects coming into the group as they become familiar with group ideology and practices. Most members are from lower socio-economic communities and many Texas members are believed to work in the oil industry. The Aryan Circle is one of the only white supremacist gangs that allows women to join.

    Tactics

    The Aryan Circle is a violent and dangerous white supremacist group that is responsible for a long record of murder.Group members were involved in the deaths of two Bastrop, Louisiana police officers in 2007.Members often engage in violent behavior towards minorities, rival gang members, suspected informants, and/or fellow gang members who are considered to be weak links in the organization.The group also has extensive criminal motives which are facilitated by the large number of members who live in open society. The group, similar to the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, has a significant impact on the methamphetamine market, through both the production and individual member use of the drug.Group leaders have recently begun to preach against drug use by Aryan Circle members in order to preserve strength and longevity in the group.[2]

    Publications

    • The Circular, bi-monthly magazine

    Gallery

     Aryan Circle logo II.JPG

    Logo of the Aryan Circle.[3]

     AC Tattoo.JPG

     Tattoo on an Aryan Circle member.[3]

     Aryan Circle members II.JPG

    Aryan Circle also includes women as full-fledged members.[3]

     Aryan Circle tattoo II.jpg

    Tattoo of an Aryan Circle member.[4]

     

     Aryan Circle hand gesture.jpg

    Aryan Circle hand signs.[5]

    AC group members.JPG

    [3]

    References

    1. ADL special report – the Aryan Circle: Crime in the name of hate. (2009, December 16). Anti-Defamation League. Retrieved from [1]
    2. Mock, B. (2007, Winter). Vicious circle. Intelligence Report, (128). Retrieved from [2]
    3. Anti-Defamation League. (2009, December 16). ADL special report - The Aryan Circle: Crime in the name of hate. Retrieved from [3]
    4. Lacy, H. S. (2009, November). Integration at its worst. American Renaissance, 20(11). Retrieved from [4]
    5. Pitcavage, M. (2009, April 7). Aryan circle hand sign. Flickr. Retrieved from [5]