Communist Party of the Philippines

Tagged:

    Table of contents
    1. 1. Organizational History
    2. 2. Structure
    3. 3. Funding
    4. 4. Tactics
    5. 5. Publications
    6. 6. Gallery
    7. 7. References
    8. 8. Communist Party of the Philippines. (2008, June 7). Flags of the World Website. Retrieved from [1] on December 6, 2011.Cardinoza, G. (2007, December 26). Joma Sison recalls birth of CCP in Alaminos. Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved from [2] Pabico, A. P. (1999, April-June). The great left divide. Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. Retrieved from [3] Constitution of the Communist Party of the Philippines, art IV-V. Kessler, R. J. (1989). Rebellion and repression in the Philippines. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Executive Committee/Central Committee. (1992). Relationship of the party with the NPA and the united front. philippinerevolution.netCPP warns against escalation of US military intervention. (2009, September 30). The Marxist- Leninist. Retrieved from [4] on December 6, 2011.Salas, S. (2011, December 5). Spread the word of revolution in lasting tribute to Ka Roger. National Democratic Front of the Philippines International Information Office. Retrieved from [5] on December 6, 2011.Communist Party of the Philippines. (2009, July 28). The Marxist-Leninist. Retrieved from [6] on December 6, 2011.Philippines captures communist rebel commander. (2011, January 5). Herald Tribune. Retrieved from [7] on December 6, 2011.Charges Dropped against Jose Ma. Sison, Founding Chairman of the CPP. (2009, April 1). Frontlines of Revolutionary Struggle. Retrieved from [8] on December 6, 2011.Sims, H. (2011, February 9). Maoist guerrillas praised for aiding calamity victims. Revolution in South Asia. Retrieved from [9] on December 6, 2011.

     

    cpp flag.gif

    The flag of the CPP.[1]

    Status: Active
    AKA: Communist Party of the Philippines, CPP
    Formed: 1968
    Areas of Operation: Netherlands, Philippines
    Ideology: Political (Communist-Marxist-Leninist)
    Group: 9,000 members
    Leader: Amado Guerrero, Armando Liwanag, Jose Maria Sison (aka Joma Sison)
    Affiliates: National Democratic Front, New People's Army, The Patriotic Youth
    RSS:
    Map:

    Organizational History

    The Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) is a revolutionary proletarian party that is currently engaged in what it terms an "armed revolution" against the Filipino government, which it describes as "the paragon of social, economic, political, and moral bankruptcy". It was founded in 1969 by Jose Maria Sison when he broke with the now-defunct pro-Soviet Partido Komunista Pilipinas. Subsequently, the CPP believes its leadership of the revolution or movement is "resolute and effective".[2] Its ideology draws upon the lessons of revolutionary struggles in the Philippines and the teachings of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Joseph Stalin, and Mao Zedong. The CPP (1) subscribes to the view that Philippine society is "semi-feudal" and "semi-colonial" as it has not become industrialized and urbanized, (2) pursues the general line of new democratic revolution by relying on the alliance of workers and peasants and winning over the urban petty bourgeoisie or the middle class, (3) considers itself the vanguard force of the proletariat or the working class, and (4) wages the protracted people's war (PPW) strategy of "encircling the cities from the countryside."[3]

    The Philippine government considers the CPP, together with its armed wing, the New People's Army (NPA), and its political wing, the National Democratic Front (NDF), as the "most potent threat" to peace, security, and development in the country. The United States Department of State has designated the CPP-NPA as Foreign Terrorist Organizations (FTOs) since 2002. The European Union has also included the CPP-NPA in its list of terrorist groups. The Philippine communist insurgency is the oldest in Asia.

    Structure

    The highest policy-making body of the CPP is the National Congress. The National Congress is responsible for (1) discussion or amendment of the group’s constitution, (2) decisions about political considerations, (3) elections, (4) approval, discussion, and ratification of Central Committee reports, and (5) creation, of additional committees, if necessary.[4]  

    The Central Committee is the highest administrative division of the Party. It is responsible for central leadership, personnel and resource allocations, support coordination, and seeing that revolutionary struggle permeates all levels of the organization.[5] Under the Central Committee are four national commissions: (1) the National Commission for Mass Movements, which is responsible for infiltrating student, youth, labor, and peasant groups: (2) the National Propaganda Commission; (3) the United Front Commission, which controls the National Democratic Front (NDF); and (4) the National Military Commission, which controls the New People's Army (NPA). There are also six territorial commissions under the Central Committee (i.e., for northern Luzon, southern Luzon, central Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, and Negros). Under these territorial commissions are sixteen regional and island party committees which plan tactics and supervise fronts.

    The structure of the CPP demonstrates how the Central Committee maintains control over both the NDF and the NPA down to the local level and makes clear that the NDF and the NPA are set up as a parallel structures, reinforcing each other’s activities.22 In the directive issued by the Central Committee to all party units and members in August 1992, it stressed that as the representative of the leading class, the CPP wields the armed struggle and the united front as "two weapons in the people's democratic revolution." It emphasized that the CPP has "absolute leadership over the New People's Army" and that it leads the united front and organs of political power and, therefore, "does not yield political power to any united front organization."[6]  

    Funding

    Funding for the CPP’s activities comes from four sources: (1) theft (referred to group members as confiscation), (2) foreign contributions, (3) extortion of businesses including multinational corporations, and (4) taxes in areas under their control.

    Tactics

    See New People’s Army

    Publications

    Ang Bayan (The Nation), publication, Rebolusyon (Revolution), journal

    Gallery

    anniversary militants.jpg

    Members of the CPP on the group's 40th anniversary.[7]

    karoger021.jpg

    Ka Roger, the now deceased long time spokesperson of the CPP.[8]

     

    car fire.jpg

    An arson that occurred during a protest by the CPP in the Philippines.[9]

     

    NOA.jpg

    Militants from the NPA, the CPP's armed branch.[10]

     

    jose_maria_sison.jpg

    Jose Maria Sison, the founder of the CPP.[11]

    philippines-npa-fighters1.jpg

    More NPA fighters help with flood relief and gain the support of the people in the Philippines.[12]

    References

    1. Communist Party of the Philippines. (2008, June 7). Flags of the World Website. Retrieved from [1] on December 6, 2011.
    2. Cardinoza, G. (2007, December 26). Joma Sison recalls birth of CCP in Alaminos. Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved from [2]
    3. Pabico, A. P. (1999, April-June). The great left divide. Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. Retrieved from [3]
    4. Constitution of the Communist Party of the Philippines, art IV-V.
    5. Kessler, R. J. (1989). Rebellion and repression in the Philippines. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
    6. Executive Committee/Central Committee. (1992). Relationship of the party with the NPA and the united front. philippinerevolution.net
    7. CPP warns against escalation of US military intervention. (2009, September 30). The Marxist- Leninist. Retrieved from [4] on December 6, 2011.
    8. Salas, S. (2011, December 5). Spread the word of revolution in lasting tribute to Ka Roger. National Democratic Front of the Philippines International Information Office. Retrieved from [5] on December 6, 2011.
    9. Communist Party of the Philippines. (2009, July 28). The Marxist-Leninist. Retrieved from [6] on December 6, 2011.
    10. Philippines captures communist rebel commander. (2011, January 5). Herald Tribune. Retrieved from [7] on December 6, 2011.
    11. Charges Dropped against Jose Ma. Sison, Founding Chairman of the CPP. (2009, April 1). Frontlines of Revolutionary Struggle. Retrieved from [8] on December 6, 2011.
    12. Sims, H. (2011, February 9). Maoist guerrillas praised for aiding calamity victims. Revolution in South Asia. Retrieved from [9] on December 6, 2011.


     
     

    FileSizeDateAttached by 
     anniversary militants.jpg
    No description
    21.11 kB17:43, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     car fire.jpg
    No description
    37.04 kB17:43, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     cpp flag.gif
    No description
    2.2 kB16:43, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     CPP flag.jpg
    No description
    6.77 kB12:30, 12 May 2011mgrayActions
     jose_maria_sison.jpg
    No description
    18.09 kB19:30, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     karoger021.jpg
    No description
    18.41 kB17:46, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     leader of npa.jpg
    No description
    25.13 kB17:43, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     leader.bmp
    No description
    750.05 kB19:15, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     NOA.jpg
    No description
    50.65 kB19:47, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions
     philippines-npa-fighters1.jpg
    No description
    48.89 kB20:00, 6 Dec 2011mgrayActions